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Course Catalog

2019 – 2020 Course Catalog

CEEB Code: 051780

 

Description of Course Types

 

College Preparatory Courses

 

St. Mary's Academy core courses and electives are approved by the University of California (A-G list).

 

Honors Courses (H)

 

These classes are demanding and require of students additional commitment, focus and effort in order to be successful. The standards and expectations are set high and intended to provide students with a challenging experience. Students must be self motivated and prepared for the level of work. Students must sign the AP/Honors Commitment Contract.

 

Advanced Placement Courses (AP)

 

AP courses are equivalent to a college-level course in the subject. AP classes require the student be willing and able to spend a significant amount of outside time on the material and in preparing for AP Exams --a national exam taken in May is required for all AP classes. College credit can be earned for successful marks on the AP Exam. Students must sign the AP/Honors Commitment Contract.

 

Academic Graduation Requirements

Graduation Requirements 230 credits.

St. Mary's Academy is a college preparatory school and students are expected to maintain at least a C average (2.0) in all academic subjects: Religion, English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Foreign Language. Students take six courses per semester and sixty (60) credits each year in attendance are necessary to graduate.

THEOLOGY

40 CREDITS

 

 

ENGLISH

40 CREDITS

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGE

20 CREDITS

 

 

MATHEMATICS

30 CREDITS

 

SCIENCE

20 CREDITS

 

Two semesters of a Biological Science and two semesters of a Physical Science.

SOCIAL STUDIES

30 CREDITS

 

VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS

10 CREDITS

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

10 CREDITS

 

 

Up to 2 semesters of PE can be earned through participation in Interscholastic Team Sports for one year.

ELECTIVES

40 CREDITS

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of California Requirements

 

  • A minimum of 150 credits in core courses must be met
  •  
  • Students planning to apply to competitive Universities should take more than the minimum requirements.
  •  
  • Eligibility to UC depends on the grade point average in six subject areas combined with SAT or ACT scores.
  •  
  • A grade of C- or higher is required in (A-G) coursework.
  •  
  • More information found about A-G coursework found at: http://www.ucop.edu/agguide/a-g-requirements/index.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Academic Discipline

Page(s)

Theology

4 – 5

English

5 – 7

World Language

7

Mathematics

8 – 9

Science

9 – 10

Social Studies

10 – 12

Visual/Performing Arts

12 – 14

Physical Education

14

Electives

14 – 15

 

Notes

*All classes are subject to minimum and maximum enrollment. The school reserves the right to cancel any class due to staffing issues or low enrollments.

 

*Faculty teaching assignments change annually and are based primarily on student course requests. Students must select courses they wish to take – NOT for or against a specific teacher or time.



Academic Discipline

 

Theology

 

 

6363   SCRIPTURES                                

Semester 1                                                            Grade 9

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In the course they will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. If they have not been taught this earlier, they will learn how to read the Bible and will become familiar with the major sections of the Bible and the books included in each section. The students will pay particular attention to the Gospels, where they may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally.

 

6153   CHRISTOLOGY                             

Semester 2                                                            Grade 9

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. In this course students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Revelation to us from God. In learning about who He is, the students will also learn who He calls them to be.

 

6233   PASCAL MYSTERY                                         Grade 10

Semester 1                                                   

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

The purpose of this course is to help students understand all that God has done for us through his Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study, students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with him, which is accomplished through the redemption Christ won for us. Students will learn that they share in this redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. They will also be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Christ and what life as a disciple entails.

 

6313   SACRAMENTS                              

 

Semester 2                                                                                 Grade 10

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that through the sacraments, and especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life.

 

6673   ECCLESIOLOGY                           

 

Semester 1                                                                                 Grade 11

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

The purpose of this course is to help the students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn not so much about events in the life of the Church but about the sacred nature of the Church.

 

6213   CHRISTIAN MORALITY               

Semester 2                                                          Grade 11

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that it is only through Christ that they can fully live out God’s plans for their lives. Students are to learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples. The course serves as an introduction to systematic moral thinking. Special attention is given to conscience and justice. Another focus is respect: for others, creation, and human life.

 

 

 

6403   WORLD RELIGIONS                     

 

Semester 1                                                          Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

The World Religions course is an introductory survey of religious traditions. Each of the major religions of the world, as well as some representative small-scale, or primal, traditions are explored and studied. Additionally, the religions of ancient Iran, Greece and Rome are presented to provide the background milieu for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The Goals for the course are 1) to become familiar with the basic teaching, myths, rituals and history of the world’s major religions; 2) to appreciate the diversity of religious viewpoints; and 3) to understand how religions contribute to the quality of human life.

 

6383   CHRISTIAN VOCATIONS            

 

Semester 2                                                          Grade 12

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

The purpose of this course is to help students to understand the vocations of life: how Christ calls us to live. In this course, students should learn how all vocations are similar and how they differ. The course should be structured around married life, single life, priestly life, and consecrated life. Students should learn what it means to live life for the benefit of others and the value in considering a vocation in service to the Christian community.

 

  1. HEALTH CARE ETHICS

 

Semester 1                                                          Grade 11

Minimum Prerequisites: Must be a member of the Health Careers Career Path Program

 

This one semester 11th grade Health Careers Program course begins with an introductory study of various ethical theories and general applications. The modern day history of Healthcare Ethics/Bioethics is presented, studied and discussed. The students explore, study, and begin to develop an understanding of the many ethical issues facing healthcare providers today. Topics discussed and analyzed include medical experimentation, organ donation, reproductive issues, abortion, and end of life issues including, euthanasia and the withholding and with-drawl of life support. Religious and legal perspectives on these issues are taken into account.  Through the examination and study of healthcare ethical issues and dilemmas the student gains personal insight and begins to formulate opinions and considerations in light of a pluralistic society that values justice in its health care systems.

 

6533   CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN HEALTHCARE

 

Semester 2                                                        Grade 11

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Must be a member of the Health Careers Career Path Program

 

This one semester 11th grade Health Careers Program course provides an introduction to the health, medicine and ―well-being; beliefs of various cultural and ethnic groups who now reside in this country; in particular our brothers and sisters from Latin America, Southeast Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Key terminology, legal cultural competency requirements for the health care provider and case studies are introduced and discussed. In addition, individual and group projects, guest speakers and outside experiences are integrated into this course to provide the student with a greater understanding and tolerance of others whose health care practices may differ from our own. Through the study and examination of various cultural healthcare beliefs and practices, the student gains knowledge and personal insight so as to better understand and respect the multitude of cultures she may interact with in the community and healthcare setting.

 

 

English

 

 

 

0151/0152     LANGUAGE COMPOSITION 1

Full Year                                                             Grade 9

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None

 

First year students will learn the basics of literary analysis through the study of different literary genres: poetry, mythology, drama, and the short story. The class reviews the mechanics of writing, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence/paragraph structure, but the main focus is on vocabulary, critical reading, and reading comprehension. The goal of the class is to provide students with a variety of skills to help them better understand and express ideas about what they read in all of their subjects. Although the primary focus of this course centers upon learning the structure of language and the methodology of literary appreciation and analysis, this curriculum also promotes an interdisciplinary approach to reading competence, exposing students to strategies particular to a range of subjects, including the hard sciences, the social sciences, an array of visual and performing arts, health and physical fitness, as well as cultural and moral perspectives. In addition, students demonstrate their reading proficiency by composing summaries and offering expository responses to both literary and cross-curricular material.

 

0171/0172     LANGUAGE COMPOSITION 1 HONORS (H)

Full Year                                                             Grade 9

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B in current English class, SMA and HSPT Placement Test, and teacher recommendation.

This course covers all the material in Language Composition 1 but in greater depth, with more reading and composition, including at least one interdisciplinary assignment referring to, or in conjunction with, a class students are taking in another subject.

 

0381/0382     WORLD LITERATURE

 

Full Year                                                            Grade 10

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None

 

This course is designed to expose students to different modes of literature from around the world. The course follows the curriculum for World History and Geography, and students will read novels, plays, poetry, and non-fiction from ancient civilizations to today. Through frequent writing assignments and oral presentations, students will develop their organizational, communicative, and analytical skills. 

 

0361/0362     WORLD LITERATURE HONORS (H)

 

Full Year                                                            Grade 10

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in previous English Honors or A- in previous English class, and teacher recommendation.

This honors course is designed to expose students to different modes of literature from around the world. The course follows the curriculum for Honors World History and Geography, and students will read novels, plays, poetry and non-fiction from ancient civilizations to today. These major works of literature will be supported by grade level documents intended to illuminate the literature and expose students to reading and analyzing nonfiction and rhetoric. Through frequent writing assignments and oral presentations, students will develop their organizational, communicative, and analytical skills. 

 

0301/0302 AMERICAN LITERATURE

Full Year                                                            Grade 11

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

This course explores the origins of American literature and relates the historical and philosophical trends represented in American literature from the Colonial period to the twentieth century. The class emphasizes critical reading, interpretation, and analysis of poetry, non-fiction, short story, and novels. Major works include The Scarlet Letter and The Great Gatsby. The writing component of the course includes critical, creative, and research papers as well as group presentations.

 

0341/0342     AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE/COMPOSITION (AP)

Full Year                                                            Grade 11

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in previous English Honors or A- in previous English class, and teacher recommendation.

This course studies early, modern and contemporary works of fiction, non-fiction and poetry within the context of historical and philosophical trends of America, including Modernism, The Harlem Renaissance, The Jazz Age, feminist writings, the concept of "The American Dream," and the literature of war. Strong emphasis is placed on written and oral critical analysis, interpretation, and synthesis skills in the AP approach; several critical papers are required. Major works include Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Hawthorne‘s The Scarlet Letter and the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Students complete at least one interdisciplinary assignment referring to, or in conjunction with, a class students are taking in another subject. This class is designed to prepare students for 12th grade AP English Literature. Emphasis is placed on writing, research, and critical reading skills WITH PREPARATION FOR THE AP EXAM. The student is required to take the AP Language and Composition Exam in May. There will be mandatory supplementary prep classes during lunch or after school.

 

 

0411/0412     BRITISH LITERATURE

Full Year                                                            Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

Selected works of English literature from the time of the Anglo Saxons to the twentieth century are studied in this survey course. This course includes special study of vocabulary and reading development, essay writing, and research, with the added goal of preparing students for note-taking and essay writing in college. Students complete at least one interdisciplinary assignment referring to, or in conjunction with, a class students are taking in another subject.

 

0471/0472     AP ENGLISH LITERATURE/COMPOSITION (AP)

 

Full Year                                                            Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in previous AP English or A- in previous English class, and teacher recommendation.

This course is planned to give the serious student of English an integrated study of British and continental writers from ancient times to modem day. Emphasis is placed on writing, research, and critical reading skills WITH PREPARATION FOR THE AP EXAM. The student is required to take the AP Literature and Composition Exam in May. There will be mandatory supplementary prep classes during lunch or after school.

 

 

World Language

 

 

4101/4102     SPANISH I

Full Year                                                           Grades 9 -11

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

A course designed to introduce students to the skills of learning a language. The basic goals are to present: 1) language in an interesting and stimulating context, 2) a realistic overview of various aspects of Hispanic culture, 3) varied exercises that provide both drill and a personalized manipulation of language, 4) a logical learning sequence from spoken to written language and guidance in improvisation and free communication.

 

 

4201/4202     SPANISH II

Full Year                                                         Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: For incoming 9th graders, the SMA Spanish Placement Test and Commitment Contract.

A course designed to build on the skills learned in Spanish I. Emphasis is placed on reading comprehension, grammar, pronunciation, writing and oral skills and free communication. Selected culture-related literary excerpts will be read and discussed. A general introduction to Hispanic culture is included.

 

4301/4302    SPANISH III

Full Year                                                           Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, and teacher recommendation.

This course is designed to develop conversational, writing and reading skills as well as providing a more comprehensive study of grammar on an advanced level. The reading selections deal with a variety of cultural topics. Students will read various selections from literature. Oral presentations are required and students work in groups to present creative skits. A more complete study of the structure of the language is included.

 

4411/4412     SPANISH 4 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP)

 

Full Year                                                        Grades 11 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- is previous Spanish Honors or A- in previous Spanish class, and teacher recommendation.

This course is designed to introduce advanced level students to selected works in the classical and contemporary literature from Spain and Latin America. The students develop their language skills while reading advanced works of literature and authentic documents. They learn to express their ideas orally and in writing. They learn to use literary terms and concepts in the analysis of the content and style of the works that they read. Students actively prepare for the AP language test throughout the year. The student is required to take the AP Spanish Exam in May.

 

 

Mathematics

 

 

1111/1112     ALGEBRA 1

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 10

 

Minimum Prerequisites: SMA and HSPT Placement Test, and teacher or principal recommendation.

Algebra 1 is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts and language of elementary algebra. The course aims to assist the student in acquiring a facility with algebraic properties and techniques.

 

1211/1212     GEOMETRY

 

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: For incoming 9th graders, SMA and HSPT Placement Test, teacher or principal recommendation, and Commitment Contract. For incoming 10th graders: None.

Geometry is designed to acquaint the student with the basic concepts of Euclidean Geometry using the concepts of algebra. The student is helped to acquire facility in using geometric principles and to develop deductive and some inductive reasoning ability. The notion of mathematical proof is introduced.

 

1221/1222     GEOMETRY HONORS (H)

 

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: For incoming 9th graders, SMA and HSPT Placement Test, teacher or principal recommendation, and Commitment Contract. For incoming 10th graders, Commitment Contract, B- in Algebra 1 Honors or A- in Algebra 1 class, and teacher recommendation.

Geometry Honors is a course dealing with proofs and applications of geometric theorems and concepts of Euclidean Geometry. An emphasis on the concepts and applications of previously developed Algebra 1 will be included.

 

1301/1302     ALGEBRA 2

 

Full Year                                                        Grades 10 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

Algebra 2 is designed so students can study the concepts and skills of algebra in more depth, increasing their understanding of the theory presented in the first-year course. The student will consider more of the theory of the mathematical system and be helped toward a mastery of the concepts and techniques of algebra in the real and complex number system.

 

1311/1312     ALGEBRA 2 HONORS (H)

 

Full Year                                                         Grades 10 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in Algebra 1 and Geometry Honors or A- in Algebra 1 and Geometry class, and teacher recommendation.

Algebra 2 Honors is designed for students whose ability in mathematics is strong. The course will cover essentially the same material as Algebra 2, but will do so with greater depth and detail. Additional topics will be included.

 

1421/1422     MATH ANALYSIS HONORS (H)

 

Full Year                                                         Grades 11 – 12

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in Algebra 2 Honors or A- in Algebra 2 class, and teacher recommendation.

Math Analysis Honors is designed for students who ability in mathematics is strong. The first semester emphasis is on the development of coordinate geometry, polynomials and trigonometry. The second semester emphasis is on the development of inequalities, functions and exponents, and logarithms.

 

1441/1442     STATISTICS

Full Year                                                                 Grades 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 courses.

This discipline is an introduction to the study of probability, interpretation of data, and fundamental statistical problem solving. Mastery of this academic content will provide students with a solid foundation in probability and facility in processing statistical information.

 

 

 

 

1451/1452     AP CALCULUS AB (AP)

 

Full Year                                                              Grades 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in Calculus class, and teacher recommendation.

This challenging, college equivalent course is for the advanced and highly motivated student and follows the curricula defined by the College Board. It is intended for highly motivated, analytical students with a thorough knowledge of mathematics: algebra, axiomatic and analytic geometry, trigonometry, and elementary functions. It is an intuitive study of Calculus I methods and applications Calculator with trig functions is required. Students must be well prepared for the difficulty and level of work. The student is required to take the AP Calculus Exam AB in May. There will be mandatory supplementary prep classes during lunch or after school.

 

 

Science

 

 

2063/2064     PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

Full Year                                                               Grades 9

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Approval of Program Director.

In this introductory course of the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Biomedical Science program, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems.

 

2251/2252     BIOLOGY

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

This course provides an introduction to the major topics in modern biology. Special attention is given to areas of cell biology, diversity in plant and animal life, genetics, physiology and evolution theories. Additional efforts are also made to increase students’ awareness of bio-ethical and environmental issues. This course will satisfy a laboratory life science requirement.

 

2211/2212     BIOLOGY HONORS (H)

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: B or higher in Science grade, HSPT Placement Test, and teacher recommendation.

This course provides more in depth to the major topics in modern biology, understanding of scientific aspects of the diversity in animals and plants. The topics include: biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, physiology evolution, many other aspects of animals and plants. Students who enroll in honors biology are required to cover material in more depth. This course will satisfy a laboratory life science requirement.

 

2413/2414     HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS (H)

Full Year                                                        Grades 11 – 12

Minimum Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology.

In this course students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis in the body. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases.

 

 

2331/2332     CHEMISTRY

Full Year                                                        Grades 10 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: C- or higher in Algebra 1 class.

Emphasis is on mathematical problem solving, observation and experimentation following the scientific method. Satisfies a one-year laboratory and physical science requirement.

 

2321/2322     CHEMISTRY HONORS (H)

Full Year                                                        Grades 10 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- or higher in Algebra 1 Honors or Geometry Honors, or A- or higher in Algebra 1 or Geometry class, and teacher recommendation.

This year long course is a high school course designed for students with a strong background and interest in science and mathematics who plan to pursue careers in the fields of science. It is a lab-oriented course that explores chemistry concepts such as atomic structure states of matter, chemical reaction, chemical products, energy, Stoichiometry, States of matter and intermolecular forces, Gases and solutions, chemical equilibrium, reaction rate, oxidation, combustion, Nuclear chemistry, Carbon and organic compounds plus biochemistry. This is an accelerated course that deals with almost all California standards. Satisfies a one-year laboratory and physical science requirement.

 

 

2401/2402     PHYSICS

Full Year                                                         Grades 11 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, C- or higher in Biology class, and teacher recommendation.

This course is an introduction to contemporary physics; emphasis is on different aspect of motion including one, two-dimension plus rational. Forces in one and two-dimension, Gravity and momentum. Energy, work and machines, plus the conservation of energy that leads to different states of matter. Waves, including sound and light. Reflection and mirror and lenses and nuclear physics. Satisfies a one-year laboratory and physical science requirement.

 

2551/2552     ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (AP)

Full Year                                                         Grades 10 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract. Fulfill three (3) of the following four (4): Overall GPA of 3.2 or higher, B+ in Chemistry Honors or A- in Chemistry, demonstrated AP potential in English OR Math on the PSAT, and teacher recommendation.

This is an introductory college-level biology course. Students will cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes – energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. Therefore, AP Biology will give students opportunities for learning through scientific inquiry, development of laboratory skills, and assessment. Additionally, it will provide students with a college-level experience as the course seeks to prepare students to successfully complete the AP Biology exam in May. The student is required to take the AP Biology Exam in May. There will be mandatory supplementary prep classes during lunch or after school.

 

 

Social Studies

 

 

3201/3202     WORLD CIV/GEOGRAPHY

Full Year                                                            Grade 10

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

This course is designed to teach students about the social, economic, and political developments that helped shape the modern world. Focusing on major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the 18th century to the present, students will investigate major events and individuals while developing their own critical thinking, analytical, geography, research, and English skills. Using and learning the difference between primary and secondary resources, students will learn the intricacies of historical thinking and then relate current world issues to past events.

        

3211/3212     WORLD CIV/GEO HONORS (H)

Full Year                                                                       Grade 10

 

Minimum Prerequisites: B- in previous English Honors or A- in previous English class, and teacher recommendation.

This course is designed to teach students about the social, economic, and political developments that helped shape the modern world. Focusing on major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the 18th century to the present, students will investigate major events and individuals while developing their own critical thinking, analytical, geography, research, and English skills. Using and learning the difference between primary and secondary resources, students will learn the intricacies of historical thinking and then relate current world issues to past events

 

3301/3302     UNITED STATES HISTORY

Full Year                                                            Grade 11

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

The first semester of United States History covers approximately nine chapters. The course is primarily a survey course that begins with the convergence of indigenous and European cultures in the Americas and concludes with FDR’s New Deal, the Depression and the eve of the Second World War.

The second semester of United States History begins with World War II. The rise of totalitarian regimes, fascism, isolationism vs. neutrality, and the American entrance into the war are all examined. Students examine the changing nature of American society on the home front and the war‘s effect on both women and minorities. Students evaluate the Holocaust, its causes and its effects both in Europe and the United States. The Cold War is studied as it emerged in Europe, Asia and the Americas; and students are introduced to the policy of Containment. The Civil Rights Movement, Kennedy’s New Frontier, Johnson’s Great Society, and the Vietnam War are examined within the context of both the Cold War and an era of protest and change. Reading and writing are heavily emphasized in this course.

 

3331/3332     ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (AP)

 

Full Year                                                               Grade 11

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in previous Social Studies Honors or A- in previous Social Studies class, and teacher recommendation.

Advance Placement United States History is a two-semester course that examines the history of the United States of America from approximately 1492 to modern times: from the discovery and settlement of the New World to the very recent past. Through the study of political institutions, social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in United States history, students will develop an understanding of some of the major themes in American history as they master factual information and analyze primary and secondary sources. Students will be able to interpret historical scholarship and draw their own conclusions from the evidence presented. Therefore, AP U.S. History will give students the opportunity to further develop skills of critical thinking, writing, and expression.

Additionally, it will provide students with a college-level experience as the course seeks to prepare students to successfully complete the AP US History exam in May. The student is required to take the AP US History Exam in May. There will be mandatory supplementary prep classes during lunch or after school.

 

3443      ECONOMICS

Semester 1                                                        Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

Economics is a one-semester course designed to allow students the opportunity to study concepts of basic economics and their applications in real world situations. Students will experience the following topics through reading and writing assignments, hands-on activities, critical thinking exercises, video analysis, and class discussion.

  • What is Economics: Evaluating scarcity, opportunity costs, and production possibilities
  • Economic Systems: Answering the Three Economic Questions in the free market, centrally planned economies, and modern mixed economies
  • American Free Enterprise: benefits, drawbacks, growth and stability, and providing a safety net
  • How markets work: Examining the relationships between demand, supply, prices, and various market structures
  • Understanding Personal Finance: Learning about how budgeting, banking, investing, and credit and debt work in our daily lives. This may also include presentations from LMU Senior Accounting students throughout the semester.

 

3453      ECONOMICS HONORS (H)

Semester 1                                                        Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in previous Social Studies Honors/AP or A- in previous Social Studies class, and teacher recommendation.

Economics is a one-semester class designed to allow students the opportunity to study concepts of basic economics and their applications in real world situations.  Students will experience the following topics through reading and writing assignments, hands-on activities, critical thinking exercises, video analysis, and class discussion.

  • What is Economics: Evaluating scarcity, opportunity costs, and production possibilities
  • Economic Systems: Answering the Three Economic Questions in the free market, centrally planned economies, and modern mixed economies
  • American Free Enterprise: benefits, drawbacks, growth and stability, and providing a safety net
  • How markets work: Examining the relationships between demand, supply, prices, and various market structures
  • Understanding Personal Finance: Learning about how budgeting, banking, investing, and credit and debt work in our daily lives. This may also include presentations from LMU Senior Accounting students throughout the semester.

 

3403   U.S. GOVERNMENT

Semester 2                                                        Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

In this course students will cover the principles of American government, origins of American democracy, the Constitution, Federalism, the electoral process, and the three branches of government (legislative, judicial, and executive) according to the California History-Social Science Standards for Government and using the Common Core goals for improving Literacy in Social Science and History. The course will address these topics through an in-depth study of primary sources documents and the Constitution.

Additionally, students will develop their reading comprehension, writing, and critical thinking skills throughout the assignments and activities completed in class and through the use of online and multimedia resources used throughout the semester. We will engage in discussion, questioning, and fair examination of the various elements of complex political and social issues relating to course content, but no favoritism or support of any political parties, affiliations, or politicians will be highlighted by the curriculum.

 

3420   ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

 

Semester 2                                                        Grade 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B- in previous Social Studies Honors/AP or A- in previous Social Studies class, and teacher recommendation.

AP U.S. Government and Politics is an introductory college-level course in U.S. government and politics. Students cultivate their understanding of U.S. government and politics through analysis of data and text-based sources as they explore topics like constitutionalism, liberty and order, civic participation in a representative democracy, competing policy-making interests, and methods of political analysis. Additionally, it will provide students with a college-level experience as the course seeks to prepare students to successfully complete the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam in May. The student is required to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics Exam in May. There will be mandatory supplementary prep classes during lunch or after school.

 

 

Visual and Performing Arts

 

1651   COMPUTER SCIENCE ESSENTIALS

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: approval of program director.

Required for all Engineering students, elective for other students with approval of the program director. Designed for 9th or 10th grade students, the major focus of Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 2D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

 

AP STUDIO ART - (5143/5144 2D Design, 5145/5146 3D Design, or 5141/5142 Drawing) (AP)

Full Year                                                                     Grades 11 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract, B or higher in previous Visual Arts class, Visual Arts teacher recommendation.

Over the course of this year long class, students with exceptional skill in drawing, painting or mixed media, or ceramics will build a portfolio of twenty-four works to be submitted to the AP board of review. Students work independently inside and outside the classroom in the media that best displays their artistic vision. First semester students focus on breadth, creating a range of artworks that show advanced skill.

Second semester students focus on concentration, picking a theme and creating a body of twelve works that support that theme. Summer projects will be assigned prior to the start of the class and sketchbooks are expected as an integral part of the creative process. Fast paced and intense, this class readies students for the rigors of a college level art studio environment including critiques with the teacher and peers.

 

 

Participation in a minimum of two art competitions is required (some entrance fees may apply). Students must have taken at least one visual arts class and be recommended to the class by their teacher.

 

5231/5232     ACTING

Full Year                                                           Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

Through exercises and improvisation, students learn performance skills and to be relaxed and focused in front of an audience. The focus of the class is to discover solo and group performance skills through the following: improvisation, pantomime, the audition process, scene work, developing a character, and stage movement. Shakespeare and classical texts will be studied in the second semester for entry into the English Speaking Union Festival and DTASC Theatre festival. This class satisfies one year of the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

 

5241/5242     ACRYLIC PAINTING

Full Year                                                       Grades 9 – 12

The course introduces the discipline of painting especially acrylic painting to the student. The course will emphasize the basic elements of color, as it relates to painting. Various painting techniques will be introduced to the student. Students will also gain the ability to analyze and respond to various works, including their own. Furthermore, the students will begin to develop a more personal approach towards their work, and will learn to analyze and make critical assessments about artworks. Through critiques, students will display the ability to aesthetically value and appreciate works of art, as well as understand the relationship between art, culture, and history. This course will continue, through previous lessons, to require students to apply what they have learned in the class to more difficult work as the year progresses. Furthermore, students will continue their exposure to numerous cultural and historical styles and motifs.

 

5321/5322     CERAMICS

Full Year                                                         Grades 11 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

This is a basic course in which the student applies design principles to hand-built clay forms, using such techniques as pinch, coil, slab and relief. Basic glazing and decorating will be covered. A field trip to a museum and a short research paper will be required. This class satisfies one year of the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

 

5463/5464     CHOIR

Full Year                                                                   Grades 9 – 12

Choir I is a year-long course in which students develop musical literacy, practice team building, and broaden cultural experience through exercises in sight-reading and harmony, vocalizes (warm-up), rehearsal, performance, concert-going, and critique. Choir I is an introductory class, ideal for students with little or no prior choral experience. There is no prerequisite for the class.

By reading music and interpreting dynamic markings, students develop Artistic Perception and Creative Expression. A varied repertoire, written by composers across the globe from the 12th century to the present, provides Historical and Cultural Context while encouraging students to identify Relationships among genres, artists, and social contexts. Listening to performances by professional and amateur choruses sharpens Aesthetic Valuing skills. Choir etiquette instills in singers a sense of accountability to their partners in the delivery of an exquisite musical product and influences their approach to working with others throughout life.

 

 

5471/5472           DANCE                    

Full Year                                                           Grades 9 – 12

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

In this course students will learn different types of dance technique and vocabulary. Students will be exposed to the elements of Western dance forms (Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Contemporary) and urban dance forms (hip-hop styles). Students will be asked to utilize these various forms and vocabulary in practice through creating and performing in a final performance at the end of the semester.

 

 

 

 

 

5561/5562     INTRO: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Full Year                                                          Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

Photography is more present than ever in our world today with social media and a camera most often available at our finger tips with new technology developing daily. Most individuals are capable of taking an average photo and looking at a photograph and determining whether or not they "like it".  However, trying to then explain why it's a "good" photograph requires disciplined and thoughtful observations, as well as precise and descriptive language, and often serves as a more complex challenge for most people.

This beginner’s digital photography course will help students understand what makes certain photographs look better than others and how to take photographs above "average".  Students will learn and explore the Elements and Principles of Design as they relate to Photography in order to use these tools and new language to create and analyze photographs.

Students will also learn about the history of photography and will be introduced to a number of important artists and artworks.  Students will also be introduced to careers in the field of photography including: nature photography, commercial photography, fashion photography, sports photography, portraiture and event photography, and photojournalism. By the end of this course, students will have designed and constructed a digital portfolio of their photography, which will showcase their photography assignments and allow them to observe and track their learning. 

 

 

Physical Education

 

 

8111/8112     PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

Full Year                                                           Grades 9 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: None

This course introduces the student to movements, skills and fitness tools to enable the student to understand fitness as a lifelong goal. It introduces team and individual sports for competition and recreation.

A waiver for physical education credit is possible only if the student becomes a player of a SMA team sport and remains with this sport as an active team player for the duration of its season and formally petitions for a waiver of the physical education requirement. This waiver must remain on file with other academic documents. This policy may apply to student managers, score keepers, equipment managers etc. upon the approval of the Coach and Athletic Director.

 

 

 

Electives

 

3423               PSYCHOLOGY

Semester 1                                             Grades 11 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract and teacher recommendation.

Psychology is a one-semester junior/senior level course. This class is a general introduction to the study of Psychology and is designed to provide students with a better understanding of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the biological, behavioral, and cognitive approaches to the science of psychology.

 

3433               SOCIOLOGY

Semester 2                                             Grades 11 – 12

 

Minimum Prerequisites: Commitment Contract and teacher recommendation.

Sociology is a one semester, junior/senior level course. It presents students with a sociological perspective on the complex social world of the United States of today and teaches sociological investigation using the logic of science to study human society. The class focuses on the foundation of social life with an emphasis on the central concepts of culture, society, socialization, and deviance. It also casts a spotlight on inequality, introducing major concepts and presenting explanations for the persistence of social stratification. Particular care is taken to include a global planetary view on sociological issues of concern to modern American women. Prerequisites: One semester of Psychology

 

 

 

 

 

5121/5152     DIGITAL JOURNALISM AND YEARBOOK

Full Year                                                        Grades 11 – 12

Minimum Prerequisites: None.

 

Digital Journalism and Yearbook is a year-long course designed to build upon and utilize 21st century skills to integrate journalism with technology, students will produce a yearbook and a quarterly digital magazine that is a reflection of the diverse student population and the collective memories of the school. Students will expand upon and develop skills to use computer programs to design advanced layouts; to take and edit digital photography; to write and edit copy to journalistic standards; to interview others; and to explore careers in the publishing and journalism fields. Students will simultaneously apply their continued learning of design and journalism to contributions in the school’s quarterly digital magazine. To support the expansion of their knowledge base in these areas, students will analyze, evaluate, and critique the design aesthetic and structure of historic and current professional publications, as well as their impact on history, society, and culture. Each unit is designed to promote the development and appreciation of the artistic medium of digital design and publishing from structural, historical, cultural, and aesthetic perspectives.